Boosting Performance with C

by jruizwp

Right after posting my last blog entry I began work on Durable Rules third iteration. My main question was: How can I improve the framework performance by an order of magnitude across all scenarios? As you can see it has been quite a long time since my last blog post. Well… I have been very busy finding an answer for the question above.

Early on, I decided to re-implement the core rules engine in C. Compared with scripting and memory managed languages, C provides good control over memory allocation and a lot flexibility on data structure definition. Obviously, control and flexibility come at a price: It took me a lot longer to develop the code.

So, in the end, this exercise was not just simply porting code from one language to another. I had to rethink and design the data structures. I also had to design and write a JSon parser. And I must say: I also took some time to invent a new feature to enable batch processing for streaming. The detailed explanation is in the following sections.

Data Structure Definition

The most important part of the project was to define a suitable data structure to represent a ruleset. The central principle: the system has to guarantee O(n) (linear) performance as a function of the input (event) size. To illustrate how this is achieved, let’s consider the simple rule definition below:

var d = require('durable');
d.run({
    rating: {
        track: {
            whenAll: {
                a: { event: ’start’ },
                b: { event: ‘end’ }
            },
            run: function(s) { }
        }   
    }
});

The code above waits for two events ‘start’ and ‘end’ to execute the ‘track’ action. Conceptually this rule is represented by a Rete tree, which root is an alpha node for message based events (type = $m). This node is followed by two alpha nodes with two rules event = ’start’ and event = ‘end’ respectively. The alpha nodes are joined by the ‘all’ beta node, which is followed by the track action node.

rete4

In my C implementation the Rete tree is a trie. Every time an event is observed, each event message property is evaluated in the trie. The conceptual counterpart of a trie node is an alpha node in the Rete tree. Thus each trie node contains the rule to be applied to a single named property. Also each trie node points to subsequent properties to be evaluated (typically derived from an ‘and’ expression). The leafs of the trie point to a linked list of beta nodes terminated by an action node.

trie

Very important: the trie node keeps the map of subsequent properties in a hash table. This is a slight deviation over typical trie nodes used in text context search, which keep a map of subsequent valid characters using an array. I decided to handle collisions in the hash table using a simple linear probing algorithm. With linear probing I get better memory usage and acceptable predictable near constant time performance as long as the load in the tables is kept low.

In order to increase memory locality and make better use of the processor cache, the trie structure is packaged in two arrays. One array has all the alpha, beta and action nodes. While a second array contains all the hash table buckets for the trie nodes. Nodes and hash tables never hold pointers to other nodes, only array offsets.

array

JSon parsing

To reduce the cost of data transformation I decided to use JSon as the event type system for this new Rules engine. Thus a JSon object could be passed directly from a Web Request input stream without any extra processing. C doesn’t have built in facilities for JSon parsing. So I wrote a lightweight JSon parser following a few strict principles:

  • Avoid Object Model (DOM) definition and buffering
  • Avoid using the heap, only use stack memory
  • Optimize for parsing key value pairs in a single pass
  • Calculate property name hashes while parsing

The JSon parser is really just a simple state machine tailored for the specific use in the rules engine. An important aside: I chose the DJB algorithm to hash property names because it is known to have good distribution and it added minimal overhead when parsing. The property name hash codes, as explained in the section above, are critical for the Rete tree ultra fast evaluation.

Batching

Compared with events which don’t match any rule, single positive event evaluation is expensive because it needs to be recorded in the Redis cache. In some cases it triggers the evaluation of a beta join and in other cases the queueing of an action. Batching helps optimizing the cost of all this activity and allows for processing large streams of data. Let’s consider the following snippet of code:

d.run({
    approval: {
        rule: {
            whenSome: { $and: [ { subject: 'approve’ }, { $lte: { amount: 1000 }}]},
            run: function(s) {}
        },
    }
}, '', null, function(host) {
    host.postBatch('approval', [{ id: '0', sid: 1, subject: 'approve', amount: 100 }, 
                                { id: '1', sid: 1, subject: 'approve', amount: 100 },
                                { id: '2', sid: 1, subject: 'approve', amount: 100 },
                                { id: '3', sid: 1, subject: 'approve', amount: 100 },
                                { id: '4', sid: 1, subject: 'approve', amount: 100 }]);
});

The ‘rule’ action will be able to process at least one event which matches the expression at the time of evaluation. The postBatch function allows clients to post an array of event messages for evaluation and dispatching.

Benchmarks

In order not to lose track of my main objective I constantly measured performance when developing the project. When talking about performance there is always a lot of confusion. So first I will explain the methodology I used for measuring, then I will present the results for three important tests.

In all benchmarks: I used the same equipment: IMac OS X 10.9.4, 3.4GHz i7, 16GB RAM 1333MGHz DDR3. I drove the CPU utilization to 90% across all cores by running the same test concurrently in as many node.js processes as needed. In addition I added as many Redis servers as required to prevent it from becoming a bottleneck. I defined the number of operations to be performed and I measured the time it took to perform them.’Throughput’ is: the number of operations divided by the time it took to perform them. ‘Cost’ is: elapsed time divided by the number of operations. In the notes below I use the unit ‘K’ to denote thousand and ‘M’ to denote million.

Reject Events Test

In this test I defined a ruleset with 30 rules and continuously asserted event messages, which did not match any rule. I ran several experiments with different event message sizes. I used two different modes single and batch events.  The objective was to measure the raw JSon parsing and the tree expression evaluation speed. Just as a reference, not as baseline, I ran the same experiments for the JScript JSON.Parse function.

negative

In batch mode durable rules is able to process a little less than 10M small messages (30B) every second, in single message mode it is 25% slower (7.5M messages every second). In both batch and single mode durable rules is able to process 1M larger messages (1KB) every second. Important note: the complexity of the algorithm is linear (O(n)) to the size of event messages. Interesting factoid: parsing the same messages in JScript (JSON.Parse) is also linear, but every byte takes more cycles to parse, indeed it can parse 10M small messages every second but only 0.25M large messages every second.

Accept Events Test

Again I defined a ruleset with 30 rules and continuously asserted event messages. This time all event messages matched a rule in the set and lead to queueing an action. I ran experiments with different message sizes and I tried two modes: single and batch. The objective was to measure redis caching and beta join calculation done in Redis scripts.

positive

In batch mode durable rules is able to process 250K small event messages (50B) every second, while it can process 60K single small event messages every second. It can process 120K and 40K large event messages (1KB) every second in batch and single mode respectively. Again, the algorithm is linear (O(n)) to the size of the event message.

Rete Cycle Test

Finally I tested the full Rete cycle. I defined a 30 rules ruleset, but in this case not only were the event messages accepted, but the actions dequeued, the messages removed and the new associated state re-asserted. All of this was done while keeping the system consistency guarantees.

full

In batch mode durable rules can run 100K small event messages (50B) through the Rete cycle, while in single mode it can run 18K. In the case of larger event messages (1KB), the results are 15K and 65K in single and batch mode respectively. The algorithm is linear (O(n)) to the size of the event message.

In conclusion the new C implementation provides a significant performance boost over my previous JScript based implementation. The new batch\streaming feature allows for flowing a lot more data through the system making a more efficient use of the Redis cache.

To learn more, please visit: http://www.github.com/jruizgit/rules.